The Boxer, A Lover Not A Fighter

May 12, 2016

I'm searching for the perfect dog. Of course, "perfect" is in the eye of the beholder. That can be seen on any given day at Petland Naperville, where they can have up to 100 (or more!) different puppies for sale. This gives me a great place to observe many different breeds of dogs in one setting. Today I watched a Boxer. I decided to speak with a Pet Counselor about this puppy, because this puppy was all muscle and movement. I wanted to know if this was an aggressive breed or not. She told me that the Boxer was a lover, not a fighter, and that she could go on and on about what a great breed the Boxer is.

 

Despite the larger look of the Boxer puppy, this breed only stands about 2 feet tall in adulthood, and only weighs 55-71 pounds. This is not what I was expecting---I thought this muscular breed would weigh closer to 100 pounds! I also found out that while the traditional fawn with black face is the most common color on Boxers (and also a brindle coat), almost 25% of all puppies born are pure white! I have never seen a white Boxer, but I will certainly keep my eye out for that from now on!

The Boxer is very attached to his family. He can, however, be wary of strangers. Surprisingly, they are really good with children, and will also protect their families. This is probably why my Pet Counselor called the Boxer a lover not a fighter! They do, however, require exercise, and if not given enough, they could chew on things that they're not supposed to chew on. Unlike other breeds, the Boxer trains best with positive reinforcement.

Boxers are playful dogs, and you can use this playtime to train your Boxer. By using rewards-based training, your Boxer may excel at learning things that require independent thinking and problem-solving. This can become a great bonding experience with you and your Boxer! Boxers are not only good with children, but also with small dogs. Sometimes, however, Boxers may have a problem with larger dogs (especially if it is the same sex as your Boxer).

As I mentioned before, Boxers need adequate exercise. This does not stop when they get old! In order to balance proper exercise, you need to feed your Boxer high-calorie meals, most of which should be from animal protein. Once your Boxer has reached adulthood, it can become a great running companion! You don't need to maintain his coat very often---just occasional baths when your Boxer gets dirty. You can also brush his coat with a soft bristle brush if you'd like. Boxers do have some possible health problems inherent to their breed, but for the most part, they are considered a very healthy breed.

Boxers are stockier than you would think. They just look like one big pile of muscle. Despite their intimidating appearance, they are gentle creatures. Overall, I really enjoyed my time with a Boxer. I love the fact that it is very interactive and good with people. I absolutely love that it can come in the brindle color combination (I like something different). I recommend the Boxer to anyone with a family and small dogs, and you can find beautiful examples of this breed at Petland Naperville.

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